The Baader Meinhof Complex (2008)

The Baader Meinhof Complex 2008tt0765432.jpg poster

  • IMDb page: The Baader Meinhof Complex (2008)
  • Rate: 7.3/10 total 15,912 votes 
  • Genre: Action | Biography | Crime | Drama | History
  • Release Date: 25 September 2008 (Germany)
  • Runtime: 150 min
  • Filming Location: Bavaria-Ateliers, Geiselgasteig, Grünwald, Bavaria, Germany
  • Budget: €20,000,000(estimated)
  • Gross: $21,383,815(Germany)(16 November 2008)
  • Director: Uli Edel
  • Stars: Martina Gedeck, Moritz Bleibtreu and Johanna Wokalek
  • Original Music By: Peter Hinderthür  Florian Tessloff   
  • Soundtrack: V8-Machine
  • Sound Mix: DTS | Dolby SR | Dolby Digital
  • Plot Keyword: German | Germany | Terrorist | Police | 1960s

Writing Credits By:

    (in alphabetical order)

  • Stefan Aust  book
  • Uli Edel  collaboration
  • Bernd Eichinger  writer

Known Trivia

  • Germany’s official submission to the Best Foreign Language Film Category of the 81st Annual Academy Awards (2009).
  • Hannah Herzsprung’s mother Barbara Herzsprung was roommates with the real Susanne Albrecht at a boarding school when they were teens. Albrecht is portrayed by Hannah in this movie.
  • As an immediate reaction to the movie, Ignes Ponto, widow of Jürgen Ponto, whose assassination is portrayed in the movie, returned her Federal Cross of Merit. She was angry that the Federal Republic of Germany has never even created a memorial for victims of the RAF, but instead helped to finance films like this one about the members of the RAF. Also, she said, she had not been warned about the graphic portrayal of Ponto’s assassination when she was invited to the movie premiere and felt humiliated by the producers for making her sit through this without a warning. About a month later, she filed a lawsuit against the producers, who claimed that every scene is historically accurate, because the assassination of her husband, which she had to witness from the next room, was not portrayed as it happened. She demands the scene of the murder of her husband be cut from the movie. The filmmakers claim that they had tried to contact her during production to get the scene right but she had no desire to cooperate. Before this movie, there had been no portrayal of Ponto’s assassination on film and she felt the staging of the movie was lurid and dishonoring to her husband. As of this writing, no decision has been reached about the lawsuit.
  • Nadja Uhl, who plays the RAF terrorist Brigitte Mohnhaupt, also played the part of the stewardess Gabriele Dillmann in the 2008 production Mogadischu. Dillmann was a crew member of the Lufthansa plane ‘Landshut’ which was hijacked to force the German government to release RAF terrorists from prison in 1977.
  • Ex-terrorist Brigitte Mohnhaupt, who was released on probation in the spring of 2008 after 24 years in jail, took the production company Constantin to court for the sex scene, demanding that it be deleted. A Hamburg court dismissed the suit in December 2008.
  • French visa # 115014 delivered on 3-9-2008.
  • Katharina Wackernagel who plays Astrid in the film is the niece of actor Christof Wackernagel who was himself a member of the RAF.

Goofs: Factual errors: While making a telephone call in an adjoining room, Ignes Ponto became an eyewitness of the assassination of her husband Jürgen Ponto in their house. In the movie, she is sitting on patio in the sunshine from where she is not able to see that Jürgen Ponto is shot.

Plot: A look at Germany's terrorist group, The Red Army Faction (RAF), which organized bombings, robberies, kidnappings and assassinations in the late 1960s and '70s. Full summary »  »

Story: Germany in the 1970s: Murderous bomb attacks, the threat of terrorism and the fear of the enemy inside are rocking the very foundations of the yet fragile German democracy. The radicalised children of the Nazi generation lead by Andreas Baader, Ulrike Meinhof and Gudrun Ensslin are fighting a violent war against what they perceive as the new face of fascism: American imperialism supported by the German establishment, many of whom have a Nazi past. Their aim is to create a more human society but by employing inhuman means they not only spread terror and bloodshed, they also lose their own humanity. The man who understands them is also their hunter: the head of the German police force Horst Herold. And while he succeeds in his relentless pursuit of the young terrorists, he knows he's only dealing with the tip of the iceberg.Written by Constantin Film  

{tab=Synopsis}

Synopsis: The film begins on a nude beach in Germany in the late 1960s, where we are introduced to Ulrike Meinhoff, a respected journalist, and her family. Meinhoff and her husband are then guests at a party, where Meinhoff reads off a periodical that she wrote about the injustice of the Iranian Government. With the Shah of Persia arriving into Berlin, there is a rally in the streets, where half the people are protesting the injustice and the other half are praising. As the protesting goes on, the Iranian people end up going into the crowd and fighting the innocent German protesters with the help of the German Police; leaving many injured and a man killed. The next scene is of Meinhoff at a television studio arguing why she favors the protesters side instead of the Governments side, and watching the live recording on her television is Gudrun Ensslin, another activist. She explains to her parents how American Imperialism is completely corrupt while Meinhoff walks in on her husband having sex with another woman. Next, we are introduced to Andreas Baader, the ringleader of these revolutionaries who decide to name themselves The Red Army Faction (RAF). Their first major rebellious occurrence takes place in a department store, where they decide to set home made bombs and light it on fire. On a television broadcast we are informed of the many student protests at universities across America and of protests in West Germany, being led by Rudi Dutschke. The film then cuts to a famous rally where Dutschke announced his views on the protest and wars occurring around the world, trying to spark everyone to join their resistance. Rudi Dutschke is then almost assassinated by a man who is accused to be from the Springer Group, which is tied to the German Government. In effect, many activists go to the Springer Group headquarters and riot. As we see there are many demonstrating protesters rioting around the world, Baader and Ensslin are in court confessing about the department store fires. As her parents discuss how they are surprised by her actions, Meinhoff eavesdrops and takes heavy interest in what they say about Ensslin. While Ensslin is in jail, Meinhoff decides to visit her and finds out that she is dedicated to fighting back against the German State. The next scene introduces Peter Boock, an activist that was almost beat to death for fighting back to police in jail, and we see that the RAF now has a main house for everyone to stay in. With the new Chancellor of Germany claiming that the rebellion will diminish soon, a man that runs the terrorist unit disagrees, stating that he believes it is only going to get worse. Baader and Ensslin leave Germany and go to Italy in 1970, where they meet their lawyer to talk about some things. He exclaims that they come back to Berlin illegally, saying that a new revolutionary group has formed and they have access to weapons, guns, money, etc. To make sure that the lawyer is not all talk, Baader demands that he empties a womans purse; which he does. Baader and Ensslin head to Berlin, where they go to Meinhoffs house to crash, saying that they have come back to Germany to change the political situation or die trying. As Baader speeds down the freeway in a stolen car, he gets pulled over and taken to prison, for the German Government wants him. In effect, Ensslin demands that they get him out right away, for he cannot wait ten months in prison. With Meinhoff setting up a fake interview with Baader at a Social Institute, Ensslin and the others plan on raiding the place with guns so Baader can escape; it is a success. This is a turning point in the film because Meinhoff decided to jump out the window with the revolutionists instead of just sitting in the room pretending not to know what happened. The escape is publicized heavily on German television, calling Baader, Ensslin, and Meinhoff terrorists and they head off to Jordan to get some military training. In Jordan, Baader has several falling outs, especially with Meinhoffs significant other, who becomes a traitor to the group and decides he wants to go back to Germany. After the training, they head back to West Berlin where they rob several banks, using their skills they received in Jordan. Being named Germany Most Wanted, the Baader- Meinhoff group is announced to by sympathized with by an estimated 7 million people in Germany, which makes it so hard for them to be brought to justice. The terrorist unit exclaims that they can mathematically find the terrorist group by using Government official reports because it will inevitably lead to where the group is living. The next scene is a changing point, two members of the group are killed in a shoot out with police after trying to flee from a police block on the road. In effect, the Baader-Meinhoff group claims that to be war and goes ahead and sets off bombs at police headquarters, U.S. Embassy, and other government buildings. The German Government decides to have all government officials are under federal control for one day in West Germany so they can track down the remaining members of the RAF. The next scene consists of Baader and two other RAF members finally being arrested, just before retrieving more bombs from a garage to do some more damage on the country. After Baader is arrested, Ensslin also gets arrested when she is shopping for some new clothes, and Meinhoff gets arrested when police raid their hide out. In prison, all the major members of the RAF are separated and put into isolation. On television, everyone watches the tragedies that happened at the Munich Olympic Games with the Israeli team and it stuns Germany, claiming that this violent state is not over yet. The film cuts to 7 months later, where Meinhoff talks about how life in prison is the absolute worst; so the whole group decides to go on a hunger strike, demanding that they get better treatment just because they are political revolutionists. Next, Holger Meins, who is dying in jail, does not get any help from a doctor to try to save his life, he exclaims that they are allowing him to die, which he does. With the RAF member trial approaching, new revolutionary members storm the German Embassy in Stockholm to try to prove a point, that this war is not over. However, with the operation being such a failure, Baader is very upset and when the trial begins he declares that he is incapable of standing trial, for he cannot cooperate with the government. With the continuous argument being about isolation, they finally allow Meinhoff to be in Ensslins cell, but it goes sour when Meinhoff realizes Ensslin is changing everything she is writing because she calls it depressing. While the remaining members meet on the rooftop of the prison, they exclaim that they must escape the prison or they will be killed by the government. The film then goes to February 1976, and things are really looking bad for the three inmates, especially Meinhoff, who has grown a separation between the rest of the group. She demands that in solitary confinement, the only way to show one has changed is betrayal, which the others agree she has done to the RAF. In effect, Meinhoff is found dead in her cell, which it is claimed she committed suicide. With the RAF trial getting lots of hype in the media, Germany decides to transfer another main RAF member to the same prison as Ensslin and Baader, and fortunately for her, she gets to walk within 7 months of being there; she immediately goes back to the underground. The plan is to get Baader and Ensslin out of prison, or else they will end up dead like the others. Immediately, numerous people are killed for the blaming of the members being murdered in prison. They send out a secret code to the current RAF members that they have little time left, for they believe they will be killed shortly. In effect, they plan a huge massacre in order to kidnap an important government official so they have a hostage. The police decide to take away all communication from the prisoners and gets rid of all their electricity, so they do not know whats going on. The two members of the RAF go down to Iraq and get a plane hijacking together, saying they must let them out of prison. We are then informed that with times changing, terrorism has become profitable for many countries and that someone from the outside is going to come kill them. The next morning, all of the RAF members in the prison are found dead. The film ends with the new generation RAF members taking the kidnapped man into the forest and killing him.

{tab=FullCast & Crew}

Produced By:

  • Bernd Eichinger known as producer
  • Tomas Gabris known as co-producer
  • Manuel Cuotemoc Malle known as co-producer
  • Martin Moszkowicz known as executive producer
  • Alessandro Passadore known as co-executive producer
  • Christine Rothe known as line producer

FullCast & Crew:

  • Martina Gedeck known as Ulrike Meinhof
  • Moritz Bleibtreu known as Andreas Baader
  • Johanna Wokalek known as Gudrun Ensslin
  • Nadja Uhl known as Brigitte Mohnhaupt
  • Stipe Erceg known as Holger Meins
  • Niels-Bruno Schmidt known as Jan Carl Raspe (as Niels Bruno Schmidt)
  • Vinzenz Kiefer known as Peter-Jürgen Boock
  • Simon Licht known as Horst Mahler
  • Alexandra Maria Lara known as Petra Schelm
  • Daniel Lommatzsch known as Christian Klar
  • Sebastian Blomberg known as Rudi Dutschke
  • Heino Ferch known as Horst Herold Assistant
  • Jan Josef Liefers known as Peter Homann
  • Eckhard Dilssner known as Horst Bubeck
  • Hannah Herzsprung known as Susanne Albrecht
  • Tom Schilling known as Josef Bachmann
  • Bruno Ganz known as Horst Herold
  • Hans Werner Meyer known as Klaus-Rainer Röhl (as Hans-Werner Meyer)
  • Katharina Wackernagel known as Astrid
  • Anna Thalbach known as Ingrid
  • Volker Bruch known as Stefan Aust
  • Jasmin Tabatabai known as Hanne
  • Thomas Thieme known as Richter Dr. Prinzing
  • Susanne Bormann known as Peggy
  • Michael Gwisdek known as Helmut Ensslin – Gudruns Vater
  • Hubert Mulzer known as Jürgen Ponto
  • Gerald Alexander Held known as Siegfried Buback (as Alexander Held)
  • Bernd Stegemann known as Hanns Martin Schleyer
  • Annika Kuhl known as Irmgard
  • Patrick von Blume known as Herb
  • Sandra Borgmann known as Ruth
  • Michael Schenk known as Anwalt Hagemann
  • Hannes Wegener known as Willy Peter Stoll
  • Johannes Suhm known as Thorsten
  • Christian Schmidt known as Paul
  • Stephan Möller-Titel known as Thomas Lorenz
  • Andreas Tobias known as Manfred
  • Jona Mues known as Pranke
  • Elisabeth Schwarz known as Ilse Ensslin – Gudruns Mutter
  • Britta Hammelstein known as Lisa
  • Christian Blümel known as Siegfried Hausner
  • Peter Schneider known as Gerhard Müller
  • Jakob Diehl known as Ulrich
  • Wolfgang Pregler known as Anstaltsleiter Stammheim
  • Leopold Hornung
  • Christian Näthe known as Kommunarde
  • Hassam Ghancy known as Achmed
  • Martin Glade known as Benno Ohnesorg
  • Carlo Ljubek
  • Andreas Schröders
  • Nina Eichinger known as Telefonistin
  • Sunnyi Melles known as Fr. Buddenberg
  • Michaela Anderle known as Sympathisantin
  • Joachim Paul Assböck known as Günther Scheicher
  • Mathias Backhaus
  • Kirsten Block known as Frau Ponto
  • Marcus Bode
  • Andreas Borcherding known as Kath. Pfarrer
  • Leonie Brandis known as Friederike Dollinger
  • Willy Brandt known as Himself (archive footage)
  • Ben Braun known as Polizist
  • Jo Brauner known as Himself (archive footage)
  • Hans-Jürgen Brendel
  • Julian Böhme known as Fixer
  • Ramzi Chaabane known as Iraner
  • Sara Ciabattini
  • René Compagnini
  • Empress Farah known as Herself
  • Frank Engster
  • Hannelore Epple known as Bankkundin
  • Marco Fischer known as Hartnäckiger Reporter
  • Samir Fuchs known as Arabischer Fahrer
  • Philipp Fündling known as Kellner
  • Uwe Grimm known as Amerikaner
  • Andreas Haslinger known as Partygast Sylt
  • Jan Haufe known as Drogensüchtiger
  • Alexandru Herca known as Demonstrant
  • Tabea Hertzog known as Kellnerin
  • Jana Honczek
  • Norbert Hülm
  • Ramona Jankowski
  • Adam Jaskolka known as Hippie
  • Andreas Kattner
  • Torben Kessler known as Polizist
  • Kurt-Georg Kiesinger known as Himself (archive footage)
  • Dorothea Klinger
  • Susann Klöden known as Hörerin
  • Ralph Kretschmar known as Gruppenmitglied Jens
  • Stanislaus Kroppach
  • Karl-Heinz Köpcke known as Himself (archive footage)
  • Jonas Laleman known as Sanitäter
  • Rene Lay known as Heinz Marcisz
  • Robert Lehmann
  • Cedric Lingfeld known as Photograph
  • Adam-Victor Linkowski known as Polizist
  • Smaïl Mekki known as Abu Hassan
  • Ilker Meric known as Israelischer Sportler
  • Stephan Meyer-Kohlhoff known as Nachtwächter
  • Monika Mondberger-Zimmerling known as Sympathisantin
  • Alexander Müller known as Polizist
  • Sieglinde Oppert
  • Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi known as Himself (archive footage)
  • Leon Palamarciuc known as Zögling
  • Eva Nadja Polanski
  • Jörg Purschke known as Sicherheitsmann
  • Johannes Reichardt known as Sympathisant
  • Alexandra Rothert known as Peters Freundin
  • Nico Rüder known as Zögling
  • Sebastian Rüger
  • Toshko Savov known as Polizist
  • Helmut Schmidt known as Himself (archive footage)
  • Ralph Schriever
  • Lara Schroder
  • Kerstin Schröder known as Wärterin
  • Andreas Schumacher known as Partygast Sylt
  • Michael Schweitzer
  • Paul Schwesig known as Baader-Sympathisant
  • Dietmar Schäffner
  • Esther Seibt known as Simone – Stefan Austs girlfriend
  • Hans-Dieter Stallmann known as Geisel
  • Pedro Stirner
  • Jutta Torkler-Schulz
  • Martin Toth known as Polizist (as Martin Tóth)
  • Karol Unterharnscheidt known as Kameramann
  • Henrike von Kuick
  • Martin Walch known as Justizbeamter Stammheim
  • Nicolas Walier known as Polizist
  • Oliver Walser known as Einsatzleiter Schweden
  • Dennis Warther known as Polizist
  • Vanessa Wieduwilt known as Mitarbeiterin schwedische Botschaft
  • Chris Wilpert known as Zögling
  • Marco Winzer known as Polizist
  • Viktoria Zavgorodnyaya
  • Alan Zielonko known as Security advisor
  • Mario Zuber known as Fotograf
  • Susanne Zygmunt
  • Joel Cross known as Riot Extra (uncredited)
  • Kim Frank known as Dutschke-Attentäter (uncredited)
  • Marc Hellige known as Zivilpolizist (uncredited)
  • Christian Hoening known as Staatssekretär (uncredited)
  • Jim McKay known as Himself (archive footage) (uncredited)
  • Ulrich Meinecke known as Student im Citroen (uncredited)
  • Goran Rakonjac known as Baader-Sympathisant (uncredited)
  • Paul Schlase known as Verletzter (uncredited)
  • Julia Stenke known as Studentin (uncredited)
  • Julita Witt known as Studentin (uncredited)

..{tab=Supporting Department}Makeup Department:

  • Abounouom Mariam Lee known as makeup artist
  • Waldemar Pokromski known as makeup department head
  • Sabine Rohrman known as makeup artist
  • Sabine Schumann known as hair stylist
  • Luca Vannella known as hair stylist: Italy

Art Department:

  • Markus Bendler known as picture vehicle supervisor
  • Tatjana Büchner known as property master
  • Michael Fechner known as property master
  • Dieter Klucke known as technical advisor: sets
  • Aziz Rafiq known as assistant production designer
  • Paola Riviello known as art director: Italy
  • Jan Saße known as storyboard artist
  • Daniel Stieglitz known as storyboard artist
  • Natalie Strohmaier known as assistant set decorator
  • Nebojsa Tabacki known as graphic designer
  • Jacob von Dohnanyi known as propmaker
  • Alexandra Zeilhofer known as assistant production designer

..{tab=Company}

Production Companies:

  • Constantin Film Produktion
  • Nouvelles Éditions de Films (NEF) (in association with)
  • G.T. Film Production (in association with)
  • Bayerischer Rundfunk (BR) (co-production)
  • Degeto Film (co-production)
  • Dune Films
  • Norddeutscher Rundfunk (NDR) (co-production)
  • Westdeutscher Rundfunk (WDR) (co-production)

Other Companies:

  • Bayerischer Banken-Fonds  funding
  • Berlin Pops Orchestra  orchestra
  • CinePostproduction  post-production facilities
  • Deutsche Filmförderfonds (DFFF)  funding (as Deutscher Filmförderfonds)
  • FilmFernsehFonds Bayern  funding
  • Filmförderungsanstalt (FFA)  funding
  • Framepool  stock footage
  • Gamp Produzioni  production services: Italy
  • Medienboard Berlin-Brandenburg  funding
  • Milan Records  soundtrack
  • Murphy PR  publicity
  • Teldex Studios  music recorded at
  • Translux  facilities

Distributors:

  • Constantin Film Verleih (2008) (Germany) (theatrical)
  • Bontonfilm (2009) (Czech Republic) (theatrical) (subtitled)
  • Metropolitan Filmexport (2008) (France) (theatrical)
  • A-Film Distribution (2008) (Netherlands) (theatrical)
  • A-Film Distribution (2009) (Belgium) (theatrical)
  • A-Film Distribution (2009) (Luxembourg) (theatrical)
  • Constantin-Filmverleih (2008) (Austria) (theatrical)
  • Golden Village Pictures (2009) (Singapore) (theatrical)
  • Imagem Filmes (2009) (Brazil) (theatrical)
  • Momentum Pictures (2008) (UK) (theatrical)
  • Monolith Plus (2009) (Poland) (theatrical)
  • Movie-Eye Entertainment (2009) (Japan) (theatrical)
  • Nordisk Film Theatrical Distribution (2008) (Finland) (theatrical)
  • Vitagraph Films (2009) (USA) (theatrical)
  • A-Film Home Entertainment (2009) (Netherlands) (DVD) (retail)
  • Aurum Producciones (2009) (Spain) (all media)
  • BIM Distribuzione (2008) (Italy) (all media)
  • Constantin Film Verleih (2009) (Germany) (DVD) (also Blu-ray)
  • Filmes Lusomundo (2009) (Portugal) (all media)
  • Giangiacomo Feltrinelli Editore (2009) (Italy) (DVD)
  • Highlight Film (2009) (Germany) (DVD)
  • MPI Home Video (2010) (USA) (DVD)
  • MPI Home Video (2010) (USA) (DVD) (Blu-ray)
  • Momentum Pictures Home Entertainment (2009) (UK) (DVD)
  • Movie Bank (2009) (Netherlands) (DVD) (rental)
  • Nordisk Film Video (2009) (Denmark) (all media)
  • Nordisk Film (2009) (Norway) (all media)
  • Nordisk Film (2008) (Sweden) (all media)
  • Odeon (2008) (Greece) (all media)
  • Oy Nordisk Film (2009) (Finland) (DVD)
  • Seven7 (2009) (France) (DVD) (also Blu-ray)
  • Video Vision Entertainment (2009) (South Africa) (all media)

..{tab=Other Stuff}

Special Effects:

  • Die Nefzers

Visual Effects by:

  • Andreas Alesik known as digital artist
  • Matthias Brauner known as main title designer & animator
  • Manfred Büttner known as visual effects
  • Oliver Kirchhoff known as visual effects artist
  • David Laubsch known as digital compositor
  • Katja Müller known as vfx & digital intermediate producer
  • Paul Poetsch known as senior compositor
  • Marco Ringler known as digital compositor
  • Norbert Ruf known as senior compositor
  • Abraham Schneider known as digital compositor
  • Stefan Tischner known as digital compositor
  • Stefan Tischner known as visual effects supervisor
  • Manuel Voss known as digital compositor
  • Tobias Wiesner known as digital compositor: ARRI Digital Film

Release Date:

  • Germany 16 September 2008 (premiere Germany)
  • Germany 25 September 2008
  • Switzerland 25 September 2008 (Zurich Film Festival)
  • Austria 26 September 2008
  • USA 26 September 2008 (Los Angeles, California)
  • Switzerland 2 October 2008 (German speaking region)
  • Sweden 17 October 2008
  • Finland 24 October 2008
  • UK 26 October 2008 (London Film Festival)
  • Greece 30 October 2008 (Athens)
  • Italy 31 October 2008
  • Norway 31 October 2008
  • France 12 November 2008
  • Switzerland 12 November 2008 (French speaking region)
  • Ireland 14 November 2008
  • UK 14 November 2008
  • Netherlands 20 November 2008
  • Belgium 28 January 2009
  • Croatia 29 January 2009
  • Portugal 29 January 2009
  • Thailand 29 January 2009
  • Germany 8 February 2009 (Berlin International Film Festival)
  • Israel 19 February 2009
  • Germany 12 March 2009 (DVD premiere)
  • Hungary 12 March 2009
  • Spain 13 March 2009
  • Poland 20 March 2009
  • South Africa 20 March 2009
  • Czech Republic 27 March 2009 (Febio Film Festival)
  • Iceland 3 April 2009
  • Hong Kong 5 April 2009 (Hong Kong International Film Festival)
  • Turkey 5 April 2009 (Istanbul Film Festival)
  • Czech Republic 9 April 2009
  • Hong Kong 16 April 2009
  • Denmark 17 April 2009 (CPHPIX Festival)
  • UK 20 April 2009 (DVD premiere)
  • Denmark 24 April 2009
  • Australia 7 May 2009
  • Singapore 21 May 2009
  • South Korea 23 July 2009
  • Brazil 24 July 2009
  • Japan 25 July 2009
  • USA 21 August 2009 (New York City, New York)
  • New Zealand 15 October 2009
  • Canada 25 November 2009 (Ottawa European Union Film Festival)
  • Canada 29 November 2009 (European Union Film Festival)
  • Canada 4 December 2009 (Vancouver European Union Film Festival)

MPAA: Rated R for strong bloody violence, disturbing images, sexual content, graphic nudity and language

..{tab=Gallery}{/tabs}

Filmography links and data courtesy of The Internet Movie Database

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